Sunday, February 17, 2013

Maternity Leave Homeschool

This extended postpartum break has meant that the kids haven't been doing much outside of making messes and watching TV. Homeschool during this break is mostly playing at home instead of their usual playing at parks all week routine.


Playdough, blocks and legos, books and library trips. McKay reads to them each night and finished Charlotte's Web with them as well as Stuart Little and is currently reading The Trumpet of the Swan with them. Now that we're close to exhausting our E. B. White collection, we need new ideas for read-alouds.

Margaret's science class is in full swing, so she does get out of the house at least for that. Last week they learned about cells and got to enact the different parts of the cell: nucleus, mitochondria, cell membrane, and ribosomes. 

Margaret has started doing a lot of doodling. She likes doodling in the church bulletin and has started doodling in books. We're going to get her a sketch book because we need to keep the picture books nice for everyone to read. You can see her artistic work on the "My Body My Choice" sign here. Click to enlarge:

My favorite part is that the "I" in choice is an umbrella for a little stick figure.

We've also looked at current issues in religion and meshed that with pen(wo)manship.

As much as I like this break, I'm looking forward to getting back into the swing of things. The kids need their regular park days and I need my friends, too. And I want regular life to happen. I signed up for a mini triathlon and I want to start preparing for it. I want our bike to come in so we can stop trying to squoosh 3 carseats in the Zipcars (we usually get Honda Civics). I guess all of this boils down to "I want to start biking again."

 Obligatory baby picture: 5 weeks old.

So favorite read alouds for preschool-aged kids?

9 comments:

  1. My kids loved the Freddy the Pig books and the first couple of Little House books are good. They also liked Ralph S. Mouse and the Henry and Ribsy books. I think B&J were a little older when we did those, but E&K were preschool age and they all listened. I also did the Secret Garden when they were pretty young. I always found books by searching the recommended book list for the ages two or three years older than them. My kids also always loved the Raold Dahl books but I think that was when K was in 2nd grade so they were a little older. Anyway, that's what I have off the top of my head, if I think of more I'll let you know.

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  2. There is a huge list on pinterest... I think I have it pinned under homeschooling but i'm not sure. How on earth are you getting them to sit still/be kids but still read? I've got charlottes web and stuart little but they just end up leaving the room after two sentences. They love picture books and Issac is only a month or two older than the twins... What is your secret?!

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    1. He reads to them as they go to sleep. :)

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  3. What kind of read alouds? Long stories with chapters or picture books? I have so many new finds to share. I am always a fan of Mo Willems and the Pigeon books but I am in love with the "Scardey Squirrel" series by Melanie Watt. We read them in my first grade with opera voices. Most of my favorites have a rhythmic fell to the story. I have a few longer favorites as of the moment and can always talk to the librarian at my school because she has the best brain to pick.

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    1. Chapter books for reading at bedtime. Picture books are for day time so the kids can see the pictures.

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    2. I will compile a list! :) Also, I was at an awesome session at a conference that focused on creating artful children/human beings, we discussed this topic at length. The overall consensus was to read the books to your toddlers that you want them to read to them selves at older ages.

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  4. We loved Stuart little and Peter Pan at our house.

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  5. Ten by Vladmir Radunsky.
    http://www.amazon.com/Ten-Action-Packs-Vladimir-Radunsky/dp/0670035637/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1361487703&sr=8-7&keywords=vladimir+radunsky

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  6. We love the Winnie the Pooh books. The language felt a bit tedious in the beginning, but once you get a few chapters in, it feels more natural to read aloud. Also each chapter is one story, so it's easy to just read a few and stop if their attention span is too short.

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